Triple B family: #huntingfamilyfriday

The first Friday of the month means it's another #huntingfamilyfriday over here at The Hunting Daddies and we are happy to introduce you all to Kevin Moore and his hunting family from Pennsylvania.  Kevin is a member of a big hunting family that brings family and friends together at their cabin which they call Triple B, as in Bucks, Bears, and Beards.   Read on to learn more about Kevin and his Triple B hunting family.

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The Triple B hunting family is made up of a group of guys bonded by the love of the outdoors.  Kevin (24yrs) is a member along with his Uncle Ron Talley (50yrs), Pop Jim Lesicko (71yrs), RJ Talley (22yrs), "Buzz" Chris Talley (19yrs), Joey Osbeck (29yrs), Kevin's younger bro- Cody Moore (22yrs), and Jake Sarmento (15yrs).

 trout season 2013

trout season 2013

 at Triple B cabin

at Triple B cabin

Q:  When did you learn to fish and hunt?

Kevin:  All of us were taught to fish from a young age (as soon as we could hold a fishing pole) and most of us were exposed to hunting just as early.  It started out as being taken along to watch and listen, and then progressed from there.

 Kevin (left) and little brother Cody

Kevin (left) and little brother Cody

Q:  What is your favorite hunting memory?

Kevin:  For me, it would have to be my first deer;  We were all up at the cabin for the first two days of rifle season - a tradition for us.  No one had seen a thing opening day due to fog and poor weather conditions.  The second morning was no better as we woke up to high winds and hard rain; no one even wanted to go out.  Uncle Ron looked at me and asked, 'What do you want to do?" to which I replied, "Well, I didn't come up here to sit in the cabin and stare at you clowns."  He smirked and with that, I was the only one to venture out to the woods that morning.  Two hours later, I harvested my first deer; a doe that had wandered into about 30 yards (less than a chip shot for my Winchester Model 88 .308).  

With the excitement of my doe, the rest of the cabin decided to join me in the woods and about an hour later, my cousin harvested a nice 11 point.  To this day, his buck is the biggest one that has been killed on the property.

 Kevin at 15 years old.

Kevin at 15 years old.

Q:  What is your preferred season?

Kevin:  Archery and late muzzloader (flintlock) seasons are my favorite - but if it has an opening day in PA;  I hunt, trap, or fish it.

 flintlock season 2012

flintlock season 2012

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Q:  What is your can't hunt/fish without accessory?

Kevin:  Face paint.  I know it doesn't do nearly as much as I think it does, but the mentality I have when my face is covered in camo is 'GAME ON.'  Also, my doe bleat.  That thing has called in everything - from deer, to bear, to coyotes.  I think I've even bleated in a trout or two from downstream - hah!

Q:  Do you have any best recipes to share?

Kevin:  One of my all-time favorite recipes (also a cabin tradition of ours) is the Triple B cheese Steak.  This tradition happens when someone harvests a deer on opening day of rifle season.  (These can be made any season and taste just as good, obviously - but the atmosphere of everyone at camp, congratulating you and chomping down on your bounty gives it that extra ingredient that just can't be explained).  

Once we've cleaned the deer, we immediately cut out the fresh tenderloins (located inside the cavity toward the back half - just back from where the rib cage stops.  There are two; one on either side of the spine.  Generally 8'' to 10'' long and a few inches thick - I've also heard them called 'preacher meat' or 'the fish').  After successfully removing these, we take them inside and slice them into small pieces and throw them into an iron skillet with peppers and onions.  After we cook them to our preference, we throw them on a roll with some cheese.  I'll tell ya - Philly cheese steaks can't touch 'em!.

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Q:  What is your favorite tip/trick?

Kevin:  Practice, practice, practice.  Whether it's calling, shooting, or casting.  I once was hunting with Uncle Ron for fall turkey and we were walking side by side down a trail when a gobbler comes busting out of a hemlock right above us.  I can still see his beard dangling against the sky and hear the sound of my uncle folding it up before I even had my gun shouldered.  Later when talking to him about it he said, "That 1100 (his shotgun) is a tool; it takes practice and experience to learn to use it."

 Uncle Ron and Kevin

Uncle Ron and Kevin

Q:  Why is hunting/fishing important to your family?

Kevin:  There are many reasons why hunting and fishing - heck, just being in the outdoors; is important to our family, but these last few  years have made one importance more clear to me.  At this stage in our lives, my hunting family is scattered across Pennsylvania.  While we do a great deal of hunting/fishing together, we do more of it without each other - due to schedule and location challenges.  But, I'll be damned if the first call I make or picture I send after calling in a big 'ole Tom, or landing a nice Brooky, or even sending an arrow over the back of that buck - isn't a call to one of them.  To us, that's what it's all about; it is the thing that keeps us all connected no matter how much time or distance separates us.

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